PSYCHOTHERAPY

What is Psychotherapy? Psychotherapy can be considered an alternative healing therapy that involves learning to increase self awareness in order to realize maximum human potential, thereby helping us to live more authentically with improved relationships, professional and financial successes, balance and grace. Psychotherapy is a general term describing many specific types of therapy such as talk therapy, narrative therapy, psycho-social therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy and counseling. Psychotherapy treatments are commonly used for psychological problems on an individual basis, with couples, families and groups. Forms of communication used in psychotherapy healing can include writing, artwork, music and dramatic theater. A psychotherapy practitioner may be a psychologist, marriage and family therapist, occupational therapist, counselor, psychiatric nurse, licensed clinical social worker or psychiatrist.   What we refer to as psychotherapy medicine has been practiced as far back as ancient Greece.  It is thought that the first recorded use of psychotherapy was performed by Dr. Josef Breuer.  Dr. Breuer would go on to be a close friend, teacher and collaborator with Sigmund Freud.  Dr. Breuer observed a woman who suffered from paralysis felt better after she ‘talked’ to him about her symptoms.  It is thought Sigmund Freud employed this ‘talking cure’ form of treatment and later created what we refer to as ‘psychoanalysis’ in Vienna, Austria in 1881.  A trained neurologist, he began working with patients who were classified as hysterical.  He continued practicing psychoanalysis into the 1930’s.   His psychotherapy treatment work was later built on by Karl Jung, Anna Freud and Otto Frank among others.  In the 1940’s, pioneer Carl Rogers brought forth a humanistic approach which rose to prominence by the 1950’s.  Psychoanalysis, humanism and Ivan Pavlov’s work in behaviorism laid the cornerstones for teaching psychology in the United States today.   Psychotherapy is an alternative healing therapy that is a constantly growing. Today there are over 450,000 licensed psychotherapists in the United States.  General research shows that the average length of psychotherapy treatment is between 6 and 10 sessions.  It has been reported that Americans spend about $55 billion on psychotherapy annually.     All Things Healing promotes psychotherapy, an alternative healing therapy, with psychotherapy information presented in articles and video form.  For more and updated information, visit us online regularly!  

Introduction to Psychotherapy
EDITORS CORNER
(Asst. Editor: Deborah Duenckel Allen, LCSW, DCSW) Nancy’s enduring interest and practice in psychotherapeutic healing arts stems from her own, very human life experiences of wou...
read more
Nancy Burnett, PhD
Tiffany has a doctorate in neurolinguistics. She is a certified dream analyst, and a certified hypnotherapist and registered member recognized by American Board of Hypnotherapy and P...
read more
Tiffany Ip, PhD

   View More Articles/Videos
   << 1 [2] 3 4   >> ... Last


by Sam Spurlin

Habit change has been written about to death and back. Anything you could ever want to know about how to change a habit can be quickly found by heading over to Zen Habits or spending about .3 seconds on Google. I’m not here to rehash that old topic again. However, I do want to talk about a specific type of habit that I’ve been working on recently...

 

Editor's Note by Debbie Allen: What are your defaults and how would you reset them? We are all human and have our fallback position and patterns. When they are made conscious, we can then choose to take a different path.

 

Psychotherapy


by Holli Kenley

Over the years, as an intern and then as a I licensed therapist, I have worked heavily in the fields of abuse, trauma, addiction, and grief/loss.  With individuals, couples, and families, I largely relied on two approaches: Client Centered and Cognitive Behavioral methodologies.  For most of my clients, their journeys were met with healing and levels of recovering that enabled them to navigate with a more whole and well sense of being.  However, as far back as 2003, I began to feel that there was more left unsaid, more left unfinished...

 

Editor's Note: Betrayal strikes at the core of trust, causing an unraveling of the foundation of intimacy. Holli Kenley describes the questions this evokes during the healing of the betrayal injury.

 

Psychotherapy


by Steven Handel

There is a structure behind most habits which behavioral psychologists refer to as “habit loops.”


Habit loops consist of three main parts. First is the cue, the trigger from the environment that tells your brain to go into autopilot and which habit to use. Next is the routine, which can be a mental or physical action you take whenever presented with the cue. And lastly is the reward, which is what you get from the habit that fulfills a craving in your brain...


Editor´s Note: Changing bad habits and developing good habits is a challenge for many people.Here is the research that shows how this works.

 

Psychotherapy


by Erin Heaven

Are there times when you feel able to manage all your tasks and get everything done, only to feel overwhelmed by everything a few weeks later? Do you have periods of excessive activity, followed by periods of lethargy?...

 

Editor's Note: There are many alternative treatments to mental health disorders that can help reduce symptoms in some patient's. It is good to have an awareness of different mental disorders and "out-of-the-box" treatments, because they can be effective in treating different things.

 

Psychotherapy


by Mel Schwartz, LCSW

Our society is in the throes of a virtual epidemic of depression. The numbers are quite staggering. More than twenty percent of the American population will experience at least one episode of what we refer to as clinical depression...

 

Editor's Note: Are high rates of diagnosed depression due to our society's increased culture of stress or due to a propensity on the part of the medical profession to pathologize a normal human response to loss? These are the questions that Mel Schwartz raises on this thought provoking article about finding the meaning in even our darkest hours.

 

Psychotherapy


 

Editor's Note: Charlotte Reznick uses children's pictures of feelings to illustrate psychosomatic elements in children's lives and the way these symptoms can interfere with life and learning. She shows how you can use Core Imagination Tools such as the "balloon breath" and other visioning exercises to listen to the body's wisdom and infuse a sense of hope in children who are feeling anxious and unmotivated. By learning to go inside and access internal helpers, children can find ways to unlock internal pressures.

 

Psychotherapy


by Russell Collins

A friend of mine recently made a pretty surprising claim about the nature of happiness. There was a little group of us up on the hiking trails above Santa Barbara where we occasionally walk. Guy is one of those people who synthesizes huge amounts of information from reading, the Web and just his day-to-day conversations, then uses it later as material to amaze his friends. This was Guy’s claim: The happiest people in the world are conjoined twins...

 

 

Psychotherapy


 

Editor´s Note: Do you ever feel incomplete? Like someone or something is missing from you? Or like you've been broken off from your original wholeness? Around this time of year, thoughts of what's missing may arise. The demand for New Year's resolutions calls our completeness into question. The spirit of perfection--perfect gift, perfect party, perfect dream come true--shows up along with the spirit of Christmas giving. Loneliness, sadness, and fear for the future creeps in with the quiet, dark nights of winter.

 

Psychotherapy


 

Editor's Note: Gwennyth Palafox, PhD talks about using technology as the music of the attunement dance when working with children who have difficulty with self-regulation. She shows how she uses technology as an interface to teach children social referencing so that they can develop the skills that they will need to develop the neuro-architecture to experience emotional competence.

 

Psychotherapy


by Carmen Schott, MSW, LCSW

I often have people ask me about Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). I find that many individuals get this disorder confused with what is called Bipolar Disorder. The two names sound similar, but these two mental health disorders are very different. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a personality disorder and involves “a pervasive pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning in early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts...”


Editor's Note:
Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder are often confused. For more information please visit http://www.nmha.org.

 

Psychotherapy


by Steven Handel

We have a natural tendency to blame ourselves when something goes wrong in our lives. This is because we have evolved to experience emotions like shame and regret, especially when we behave in a ways that violate the expectations of ourselves and others...

 

Editor´s Note from Debbie Allen: Shame is at the root of many psychological problems. Learning self-forgiveness is a step on the path of removing feelings of shame. Steve Handel has looked at the research on forgiveness and offers some helpful tips about how to forgive oneself.

 

Psychotherapy


by Steven Handel

What are intrusive thoughts?


Intrusive thoughts are involuntary and unpleasant thoughts, images, or ideas that pop into our mind.


They are a common symptom in those with anxiety, depression, OCD, and PTSD; however, the truth is most people experience intrusive thoughts from time to time...


Editor´s Note from Debbie Allen: Mindfulness studies are providing new ways to work with changing intrusive thoughts. Urge surfing is just one of these strategies that helps.

 

Psychotherapy

   View More Articles/Videos
   << 1 [2] 3 4   >> ... Last


All title links for 

PSYCHOTHERAPY

When You Hear Your Partner, Are You Listening?

by David McCann, Ph.D. & Janis McCann, Ph.D.

The art of listening is the heart of communication. We believe that if we do not come together and listen to one another, we cannot have a healthy culture. But if we do sit down and listen to one another, we can remake the world—one relationship at a time.

 

Enter your email address to sign-up for our Newsletter.
Email Address
We value your privacy. We will never rent, sell, or otherwise use your email address for anything other than the services you specifically request. Period.
Editors Spotlight

Film/Video Acupuncture/TCM
Visit Film/Video Visit Acupuncture

Click here
to view all of our ATH editors.
select category:
find within:  miles
from  zip code.
or
by state
by country


List Your Practice/Org
for Free
 
Our Mission at ATH

We at ATH are committed to bringing together a worldwide community of individuals and organizations dedicated to informing and educating people on topics relating to alternative healing of mind, body, spirit and the planet at large.
Atlanta Web Expert: Affordable, reliable, web design and web application development services.
 

Spiritual & Healing Practices | Healthy Lifestyles | Community | Arts | Find Practitioners & Orgs | Forums
Our Store | Aldea Verde de Costa Rica | Submissions | Editors | Terms and Conditions | About Us / Contact Us

 

Disclaimer. Each category is under the supervision of dedicated editors who are passionate about their topic and believe that raising people's awareness is one way to make a difference in the world. You may or may not agree with all that is presented. Since respectful discourse is an excellent way to learn and grow, we welcome comments on articles and your participation on the Forums.

  © 2010-2014 Inspiring Change, LLC     REGISTER      LOGIN Web by MacDaddi | Developed by AWE